Hacking Russian Travel

We’ve just passed our 6 month travelversary! I can’t believe it. Ryan and I are already halfway through this crazy year.

In mid-October we completed the Trans-Mongolian Railway and arrived in Moscow. In one of our upcoming posts I will write about that epic train journey. But, for now, here’s a bit about our time in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

Moscow. Moscow really kicked off the “European” part of our world tour. The mix of Soviet and baroque orthodox architecture across the city really stood out. The metro stations around the city are amazing. Each one was designed by a different Russian architect during the Soviet era.

We spent our first full day wandering around the city center, taking in the Cathedral of Christ the Savior and beautiful views while walking along the Moskva River. Along the Moskva, we walked through the Muzeon Park of Arts next to the Tretyakov Modern Art Gallery. The park is now home to many Soviet-era statues featuring Stalin, Lenin and other figures.

We also went to GARAGE Modern Art Museum while in Gorky Park, like Moscow’s Central Park, to view an exhibit of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. After the park we made our way over to the Музей советских игровых автоматов or the Museum of Soviet Arcade Games where for only $7.50 you can step back in time and play some whacky 80s games.

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Cathedral of the Annunciation inside the Moscow Kremlin

Of course we went to the Moscow Kremlin and Red Square. I found the collection of the Armory Chamber inside the Kremlin Museum to be particularly interesting.

Cosmonaut Monument

Tsiolkovsky Monument

One of the best parts of our time in Russia was visiting with my buddy Nick, an old friend from DC who now lives and works in Moscow. Thank you for hanging out with us and taking us to eat delicious Georgian food!

On our last day in Moscow, I spent the day recuperating from a nasty cold and Ryan headed off to the Cosmonaut Museum. In his words: “The best part was the dogs. The remains of the first two space dogs have been stuffed and mounted. I learned that the Soviet Union had a shuttle program.”

 

St. Petersburg. After spending literally weeks on trains across two continents, it felt incredibly luxurious to catch the high speed train between Moscow and St. Petersburg. Only a few hours later and we were at our destination.

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The Peter and Paul Cathedral inside the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. The imperial tombs at the cathedral house the remains of almost all the Russian emperors and empresses from Peter the Great to Nicholas II.

A highlight of St. Petersburg for me was visiting the Fabregè Museum. For some reason, my mom and I are both pretty obsessed with the imperial Fabregè eggs. It probably started when I was a kid and we visited the Hillwood Estate in Washington, DC, which has two of the eggs in its collection. Between 1885 and 1917, the House of Fabregè manufactured 50 imperial Easter eggs for the royal Romanov tsars and family. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond also has the largest collection of eggs, five in total, outside of Russia and Ryan and I used to live across the street from the museum. After our time in Moscow and St. Petersburg I can happily say I’ve now seen 25 of the 43 eggs still around.

St. Petersburg is obviously known for The State Hermitage Museum, the largest art museum in the world. Ryan and I wandered around the Hermitage for over 5 hours and still didn’t get to see the whole thing. Its an incredible collection and enjoyable peek into the opulent imperial palace. I also found the information on how the museum protected its collection both during the revolution and WWII of great interest.