Our Annapurna Trek Part Two: Manang – Tatopani

Sorry for the delay! We’ve been seriously enjoying our time in SE Asia. So far we’ve spent time in Singapore, Melaka and now Kuala Lumpur. More to come on that, but first here’s the second part of our Annapurna trek:

We made it up and over the Thorung Pass during the second week of our Annapurna trek. This was a really interesting couple of days because we took a 2-day sidetrip up to Tilicho Lake, made it over the pass, and entered the region of Mustang.

Day 7: Manang to Tilicho Lake Base Camp. After two nights in Manang we headed back out on the trail. From here we took a side detour from Manang to Tilicho Lake. Instead of hiking from Manang to Yak Karka (our next stop on the main Annapurna trail) we took a side trail to the Tilicho Lake Base Camp. The hike probably took us 8 hours (incl. breaks and lunch). It was pretty steep getting up to Shree Karka (a small enclave of a couple guesthouses on the trail) but we were rewarded with spectacular views. After the lunch spot we got to an infamous landslide area on the trail. We’d read about this on other blogs. While mostly fine, there were definitely a few treacherous spots. You can see our pics from this section! After such a long day, when we finally made it to the base campe, I rewarded myself with a chocolate pancake for dinner. I really wish I had a picture of it. Sleeping at this elevation and hiking to Tilicho Lake the next day also helped us acclimate before tackling Thorung La pass.

 Day 8: Tilicho Lake Day Hike. Tilicho Lake is one of the highest lakes in Nepal and the world. The lake sits at an elevation above 16,000 ft. While the hike was fairly steep, it felt amazing to spend a day hiking without having to carry our full packs. The views of the valley, the mountains and the lake were absolutely amazing. I don’t think this is something I’ll ever forget.

Tilicho Lake Hike

Water break on the hike up to Tilicho Lake

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Tilicho Lake Hike

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Tilicho Lake Profile

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Tilicho Lake. One of the highest lakes in the world at almost 5000 meters. Absolutely stunning.

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Snow and ice feeding Tilicho Lake. We witnessed 2 small avalanches in the distance while at the lake.


Day 9: Tilicho Lake Base Camp – Yak Karka. Fortunately we did not have to trek all the way back to Manang to get back on the main Annapurna trail. From base camp we backtracked through the landslide area again (how fun!) and stopped for lunch at the same restaurant in Shree Karka. From there we were able to take a new path on to the village of Yak Karka, cutting over to a new section of trail. I don’t have pics from this section because, to be honest, I was pretty exhausted. The village of Yak Karka is quaint and one of the last real settlements we went through until we hiked to the other side of the pass. Fun fact: At this elevation hot showers aren’t really available!

Day 10: Yak Karka – Thorong Phedi. Yak Karka to Thorung Phedi is a relatively short day. At this elevation, you should only gain so much elevation in one day to avoid feeling sick. At this point there are two sleeping options before tackling the pass. You can sleep at Thorung Phedi or Thorung High Camp. High Camp is about an hour or so past Phedi and there is a very steep climb between the two. The benefit to continuing on is that you can start your ascent with a bit of a head start the next day. The downside is its colder at high camp and your quality of sleep with probably be diminished. We decided to stay at Thorung Phedi for the night. The food here is actually decent! Better than I expected. We had soup, spring rolls, lots of tea and a tomato pasta dish for dinner. The vibe here was also the most backpacker-y/hippy-dippy so far because its not an actual village where Nepalese live but instead just an outpost on the trek.

Day 11: Thorong Phedi – Thorong La – Muktinath. Today was the big day! We got a very early start at 4:30 AM with a breakfast of cinnamon rolls, boiled eggs and tea. There were actually really good baked goods up here. The most difficult part of the day physically was the first hour or so getting from Thorong Phedi to High Camp. From there it was a few more hours to reach the pass, but the grade was much more gradual. The weather was incredibly foggy and overcast and so it was difficult to see more than a few yards ahead at a time. But we finally made it to Thorong La! It felt like an incredible achievement. For me, mentally, the more difficult part of the day was getting down to the village of Muktinath. I think I had a lot of adrenaline flowing to get me over the high point and then it all vanished as we started making our way down. I’m sure a touch of altitude sickness played a part too. It felt like it took forever to get to Muktinath. It also didn’t help that we were still shrouded in fog. Once we broke through you could see the layer of fog hanging over the mountains and then the sun shining on the lower villages. Muktinath is a really interesting town because its the site to several important Buddhist and Hindu temples. Lots of Indian folks make a pilgrimage here. It was really interesting to see a lot of tourists and pilgrims around when for days we’d only seen locals or other trekkers.

Day 12: Muktinath – Kagbeni. The next day we walked along the road from Muktinath through the town of Jarkhot to Kagbeni. Kagbeni is an incredible village. Its medieval, decently large, has a large monastery and beautiful views of the Mustang region. Mustang is more desert-like than Manang (the region we were in before crossing over the Thorung Pass). Kagbeni is also the entryway to Upper Mustang, which is a restricted region in Nepal. To trek further into Upper Mustang you need a guide and a special permit that runs $50 USD/day/person. We were really excited to stay in Kagbeni to get just a taste of Mustang and its certainly an area I would return to. Upper Mustang is formerly the Lo Kingdom and was off limits to foreigners until 1992. Because of this its cultural heritage is incredibly well maintained. Very Tibetan.

The other big draw of Kagbeni is the Yac Donald’s! Ryan had read about this restaurant online and we had even heard a few positive reviews from others on the trail so we were very excited to eat here. The food did not disappoint! We ended up staying at the guesthouse attached to Yac Donald’s and had yak burgers with cheese for lunch and dinner. Kagbeni was a bit more expensive than some fo the other villages we have stayed in. For example, our room at the hotel was 500 rupees (or $5 USD). It was actually a very nice place and we had a private bathroom with a shower attached to our room. Comparatively, many of our guesthouses in Manang did not charge for the room itself (assuming we ate dinner and breakfast there) or were only $2 or $3.

Day 13: Kagbeni – Marpha. Today we planned to trek to the village of Marpha where we would have a rest day. The day started out great as this was supposed to be a pretty light day or hiking. However, in this area, most of the trek is along the road, which is not as enjoyable as hiking on a trail. We had the idea to try and find the alternate trail on the other side of the river for a more scenic hike. This did not go well. After four extra hours of losing the trail, backtracking, finding the trail, finding out that the trail had been washed out, backtracking again, we had to give up and go back to the road. Of course at this point it started raining and our spirits were low. Luckily, once we’d gotten ourselves going the right way, we ran into a lovely Scottish fellow named Colin. His company could not have come at a better time! We finished walking to the village of Jomsom with him and his company was entertaining and diverting. Jomsom is a relatively large village as it is a transit hub and there is an airport here. It didn’t seem like the most pleasant village, so I would recommend continuing on to Marpha, which is incredibly charming.

Day 14: Rest day in Marpha. It was so nice to spend a day relaxing in Marpha! We wandered around town, we did laundry, we drank the local brandy. Marpha is known for its apple orchards and so apple cider, apple juice and apple brandy are all local. Ryan also tried apricot brandy, which was very good.

Day 15: Marpha to Ghasa. Pretty uneventful day. Right after Marpha there is a Tibetan village where people settled after the Chinese annexation of Tibet.

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Yak head seen in Tibetan village outside of Marpha.

Day 16: Ghasa to Tatopani. In Nepalese the words tato and pani literally mean hot water. Tatopani has hot springs! We settled into a charming little guesthouse right by the hot springs that seemed very popular with trekkers and went out to enjoy the hot springs pools. The water was super hot and felt amazing after over 2 weeks trekking. At the hot springs we also met three Nepalese guys on a mini vacation. They were so nice and we sat with them for a few hours enjoying some beers and chatting. It was super fun to talk to them about Nepal, the US, look at pictures of their kids and just hang out. We had a great time!

Day 17: Ghorepani failure, back to Tatopani. Our original intent was to walk the entire Annapurna Circuit trek, which ends in a village called Nayapul. Our plan was to trek to the village of Ghorepani on this day, get up early the next day to hike up Poon Hill (known as a wonderful view point) and then onto the end. However, to get to Ghorepani you have to hike up some major hills. We were back in the humid forest area and at this time of year its getting hot and rainy. It was just too hot and humid for me so after an hour or two of trekking we decided to head back, call it a day, and take the bus to the lakeside town of Pokhara the next day.

So, our Annapurna Circuit trek came to an end. This was one of the most amazing adventures. We met some great people and saw incredible landscapes. I would recommend this trek in a heartbeat.

Day 18: Bus from Tatopani to Pokhara. Another 6 hour bumpy bus ride! It felt amazing to pull in Pokhara. After nearly 3 weeks of trekking it felt incredible to relax in this lakeside town for a few days and take a load off.

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A couple photos from Pokhara:

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Sunset over Phewa Lake from the river walk

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View of Pokhara and Phewa Lake from the Peace Pagoda

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Peace Pagoda in Pokhara

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